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PT with TRISH

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MAKE TODAY'S CHILDREN TOMORROW'S HEALTHY ADULTS

In the past 30 years, obesity rates have doubled among children and tripled among adolescents, and the amount of physical activity in schools has drastically decreased. Allow me to share my knowledge and skills to develop age-appropriate exercise programs for your family, after-school program or school. Together, we can improve the overall health and well-being of children and teens, and help instill the value of physical activity at an early age.

MY SERVICES AS A CERTIFIED YOUTH FITNESS SPECIALIST


If your child/children are not a risk for obesity, there are other ways I can help them develop movement skills and achieve the daily recommended 60 minutes of moderate daily activity.


THE ABCs of PHYSICAL ACTIVITY


1. Locomotor skills: Running, jumping, hopping and skipping

2. Object-control skills: Catching, throwing, kicking and bouncing

3. Stability skills: Balancing, twisting, rotation and landing

Naturally, kids develop these skills and movement patterns by the age of 6 or 7, but the level of competency varies on an individual basis. Not all kids are born with the same motor control or coordinative abilities. Some kids are naturally athletic, while others struggle with simple activities. 

It’s critical that health professionals and coaches implement fitness programs that reinforce these ABCs at a young age so that every child has a better chance at improving their strength and coordination beyond what comes naturally. Of course, there will still be a discrepancy among children as they practice and develop these skills. The goal is simply to provide guidance and coaching to develop a stronger foundation of physical ability for every child without leaving it solely up to genetics.

In every class there are two types of kids: those with low motor competency and those with high motor competency. Who do you suspect will want to participate more often? Who will be more aggressive and eager to learn? Who would rather sit and watch? Who would rather hide behind the bleachers? You guessed it! Knowing that the level of physical ability is directly related to participation and confidence makes it even more important to encourage kids of all fitness levels to engage in these ABCs of physical activity. 



Source: American Council on Exercise

 Renderer // Fitness // 9/9/2014